Executive Summary School Accountability Report Card, 2005-06

 

For Sun Valley Charter School   

 

 Address:

 2102 Main St., Ramona CA 92065-   

 Phone Number:

 (760) 788-8008   

 Principal:

 David Tarr   

 Grade Span:

 9-12   

 

This executive summary of the School Accountability Report Card (SARC) is intended to provide parents and community members with a quick snapshot of school accountability. The data presented in this report are reported for the 2005-06 school year, except the School Finances and School Completion data that are reported for the 2004-05 school year. For additional information about the school, parents and community members should review the entire SARC or contact the school principal or the district office.

 

About This School


Student Population

Sun Valley Charter High School is open to all high school students who are residents of the State of California and who satisfy Education Code requirements for physical proximity to the school (i.e. they live in San Diego County or an adjacent county within the state). Students participating in the site-based campus program must live close enough to the school to attend on a daily basis. The primary focus of the school is to prepare students for entrance into college. Secondary foci are technology and the arts.

Mission/Vision

The mission of Sun Valley Charter School is to inform, inspire, and empower students, living in the rural community of Ramona, utilizing creative instructors, a comprehensive curriculum, an integrated educational philosophy, and an innovative learning environment. Through Sun Valley Charter School, students will cultivate academic excellence, achieve technological proficiency, and develop practical skills; they will understand our diverse society from a perspective that comprises world and national history; they will become self-motivated, competent, lifelong learners, and they will kindle a lifelong desire for personal enrichment, strong family relationships, and community involvement.

Curriculum Focus

The curriculum at Sun Valley Charter High School is integrated, as far as possible. We believe that, if we tell the grand story, the details will also be remembered. We have gone beyond merely connecting English and humanities. Our curriculum ties together history, geography, English, science, math, art, music, philosophy, and self-reliance. Our teachers work as a team - not by subject matter, but by grade level. They knit the fabric together with a combination of high-tech and low-tech projects. Students learn how to put together PowerPoint presentations and develop graphs and figures from spreadsheets, but they also learn how to put together wooden plows and design and build trebuchets

 

Courses are developed by first reviewing California Content Standards, University of California “a-g” course requirements, national standards (if applicable), and requirements created by the faculty locally. Those standards and requirements are included in the course content at the start of the development process. Once the basic outline of each course is created, the teachers work together to find the areas where the curriculum can be connected across academic lines. Teachers take into consideration all of the resources that might be available to show the connections between the subjects. Once the courses are integrated to the fullest extent possible, the course outlines are finalized and a curriculum calendar is established for each semester.

The core courses at Sun Valley Charter High School have been designed to meet the “a-g” entrance requirements of the University of California. Those courses were approved by the University of California in April 2006.

 

In addition to meeting the criteria for college entrance, courses at Sun Valley Charter High School have been designed to promote critical thinking. At a time when an increased emphasis has been placed on standardized test scores, we feel it is important to keep the focus on critical thinking and problem solving skills. The coursework at SVCHS places a greater emphasis on process over content. It examines cause and effect, and places a premium on the ability to adapt old information to new circumstances. We believe that by keeping the focus on higher order thinking, students will be better able to make sense of the content.

 

Sun Valley Charter High School is fully accredited by the Schools Division of the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC).

Teaching Strategies

Our teachers employ a variety of strategies to create a learning environment that works for all students. We believe that students learn in many different ways, each one working from an individualized center of strength. This concept is in line with Howard Gardner’s theory of multiple intelligences. Gardner expressed the belief that there is not one “right” way that the mind works. Instead, it operates independently and autonomously in several different modes of intelligence, each one appropriate to a particular field of human endeavor.

 

Our classroom activities are designed to target the different ways in which students learn. Some of the time is spent on the more traditional methods of instruction such as lectures and note-taking, but teachers add in visual and multi-media components to address the needs of visual learners. Some students retain more information through hands-on activities that require them to work through problems individually and develop solutions from within their own minds before they can fully understand the principles taught in class. Students are also encouraged to research topics via electronic resources on the web and through the school network.

 

In our science courses, the teachers work from a constructionist approach. They challenge students to take the information they have learned in class and develop predictive models that can be tested. The students are asked to explain their predictions to the class before they perform experiments. Following the experiments, they analyze their data, compare it to their predictions and revise their hypotheses.

Technology

Technology plays a large role in our school, as it does in the 21st century world. From the first day, students are expected to work on the computer, learning the basic skills they need to compete in the modern work force. Students go beyond merely learning how to use computer programs-they learn how to use those programs to develop finished products. Students are given access to an electronic library that enables them to research projects from home as well as at school, and web sites are used to supplement instruction and research. The pre-Algebra and Algebra classes operate in the math lab, with each student working on an individualized program. Class assignments and electronic resources are made available to students on and off campus through an open source program called Moodle (similar to the Blackboard program used at many colleges and universities).

 

The Charter School is breaking free from the stereotype of 20th century schools by favoring electronic media over textbooks. While yet in its infancy, this approach should prove to be the wave of the future for secondary education. We are searching out the latest innovations in electronic books, interactive software, and e-research techniques. The use of electronic resources allows us to adapt and update our curriculum on a regular basis. Despite our emphasis on electronic media, print books have not been completely abandoned. We provide some textbooks as a supplemental form of information and we use books for many of our literature selections. In addition, students are encouraged to read for pleasure outside of their school assignments.

 

Teachers use technology on a regular basis, both for the development of course materials and for presentation in the classroom. While the particular uses of technology will vary depending on the subject matter, the following are representative samples of how teachers use technology at SVCHS. Teachers build their courses on Moodle, which is a web-based program that allows students to view assignments, access electronic resources, interact with other students in classroom forums, download worksheets, take certain types of tests online, and turn assignments in electronically. English teachers make their literature and vocabulary resources available online. Students are asked to participate in web quests designed by teachers to lead them through educational websites. Teachers use PowerPoint presentations to make their lectures more interesting. Some courses, such as the math program and elements of the physics program use interactive computer resources to teach, guide, or assist students in analyzing data. Students are expected to use the online library (Questia.com) along with other web resources to do their own research and develop their own PowerPoint presentations.

School Environment

The school is currently located in a six year old commercial building that originally housed a restaurant. In addition to the 11,000 square foot concrete block building, three modular buildings have been added to give the school a total of nine classrooms. Two of those classrooms are computer labs and two other classrooms have a full compliment of computers (25) in addition to a full set of student desks. One of the rooms has been converted into a biology and earth science lab, and another of the rooms serves as an art and ceramics room. In addition to the classroom space, the school has a small on-campus library (in addition to its electronic library), a counseling office, a special education office, general administrative space, and a small theater/auditorium.

 

The Charter School is designed to operate with a maximum of 25 students per classroom. The current student to teacher ratio is 15:1. There is still room to expand the student population on the current site while offering classes of less than 25 students. The smaller class sizes allow teacher to make a greater connection with their students. In small classrooms, students are more likely to speak up and ask questions and less likely to feel intimidated. The smaller class loads also give teachers more time to spend with each individual student.

School Culture

There are three things that are unique to our school. First, our school has the feel of an extended family. Our teachers know the personalities of each of their students and treat them as their own children. When they misbehave, we know how they will react to discipline and we know which parents will work with us to solve the problems. When our students perform well, we feel their excitement. Our students all know each other well and are protective of one another. This sense of family helps students build a camaraderie that is seldom seen in larger schools. In addition, our parents are fully committed to providing assistance to the school. They participate on parent committees, help with fundraising, volunteer at the school, and help in the recruiting of students.

 

Second, our school is a safe haven for shy students. We have a number of students at our school who have been bullied or picked on somewhere else because of their quiet nature. We have other students who have come from a home school environment or a small private school. At our school, students can be quiet without being harassed. The family atmosphere we have allows our students to appreciate each other for who and what they are, without seeking to pressure them into changing to be more like everyone else.

 

And third, our teachers are far more committed than the average teacher. We ask a lot from our teachers, and they give back more than we ask. Most of our teachers are preparing for three or four different courses every day. At the same time, they are developing the curriculum for the new courses that are being offered for the first time at SVCHS. As a small school, we ask our teachers to take on duties outside the classroom. They serve as advisors to clubs and organizations without stipends. Our teachers are also custodians in their classrooms. They clean up the trash and vacuum the floors on a regular basis. Some of our teachers worked at the school over the summer, assisting with the remodeling and curriculum development, all without pay. Our teachers are frequently at the school an hour ahead of classes and most stay for two or three hours after school to work with students and prepare for the next day. They are fully committed to our students and this school.

Advanced Placement

Sun Valley Charter High School currently offers three advanced placement (AP) courses: AP English Literature, AP U.S. History, and AP Biology. SVCHS plans to work with the University of California to utilize their online AP courses to fill in areas where the school is unable to provide AP courses on campus. The UCCP currently offers a full compliment of 14 AP courses designed to prepare students to take the AP tests. The courses are taught by UC instructors, and course credit would be assigned by Sun Valley Charter High School.

Remediation Strategies

Sun Valley Charter High School offers a number of remediation strategies for students who are struggling in their classes. For students who are have not yet developed the necessary skills to understand Algebra I, Sun Valley offers a pre-algebra course designed to raise the students’ basic math abilities. Students who are struggling in their math courses have math tutoring available to them before and after school.

 

Reading remediation is offered in a small group setting with an English teacher. Students work on reading techniques, word recognition, and vocabulary building. The small group setting allows the teacher to focus on the needs of the individual students. Practice in reading remediation is in addition to their regular English class.

 

After school tutoring is available to all students in all subjects. The teachers make themselves available two to four times per week for an hour after school. In addition to individual tutoring, the school provides student monitoring at the request of the parents. Students who participate in the monitoring program are required to write all of their assignments in a daily planner. As the assignments are turned in, teachers sign the planners so that parents can check progress on a daily basis.

Special Education/504

Special education services are provided to Sun Valley Charter High School through a Special Education Agreement with the Ramona Unified School District. The RUSD is the school’s LEA for special education purposes. Currently, the District services 9 students on the SVCHS campus through individualized educational plans.

 

In addition to the special education services provided by the District, Sun Valley provides educational accommodations on its own through Section 504. Typical accommodations include preferential seating, additional time on tests, and after school tutoring. Smaller classroom sizes are already available.

English Language Learner Services

Sun Valley Charter High School currently has 6 English Language Learner (ELL) students enrolled. Most of those students have been attending schools within the RUSD for several years and have achieved level four status through CELDT. Most of the ELL students currently enrolled at SVCHS are fluent English speakers and all of them have opted to participate in full inclusion, English-only classes. Tutoring and reading remediation are available to all ELL students.

Standardized Testing

Sun Valley Charter High School participates in all standardized testing programs mandated by the State of California. Those programs currently consist of California Standards Testing (CST), the California High School Exit Exam (CAHSEE), California English Language Development Testing (CELDT), and 9th grade Physical Education Testing. Results are reported to the SVCHS Board of Directors and the RUSD. Results are also reported in the local newspaper and made available to parents

 

 

Student Enrollment
 

 Group 


 Enrollment 


 Number of Students

128    

 African American   

0.0 % 

 American Indian or Alaska Native   

2.3 % 

 Asian   

0.0 % 

 Filipino   

0.8 % 

 Hispanic or Latino   

13.3 %  

 Pacific Islander   

0.0 % 

 White (Not Hispanic)   

82.8 % 

 Multiple or No Response   

0.8 % 

 Socioeconomically Disadvantaged   

1.1 % 

 English Learners   

2.0 % 

 Students with Disabilities   

6.0 % 

Teachers
 

 Indicators 


 Teachers 


 Teachers With Full Credential   

 Teachers Without Full Credential   

 Teachers Teaching Outside   
   Subject Area of Competence

 

 Misassignments of Teachers   
   of English Learners

 

 Total Teacher Misassignments   

 


 School Facilities
 

Summary of Most Recent Site Inspection


The facilities which comprised the Sun Valley Charter High School during the 2005-2006 school year included an 11,000 square foot steel reinforced concrete building plus three 900 square foot earthquake ready portables that were moved onto a portion of the parking lot during the summer of 2005. The main building includes six classrooms, an assembly hall, administrative offices, a resource room for the special education teacher, and a combination library and faculty work room. The three classrooms housed in portables are accessible via ramps which originate near the exit doors at the west end of the main building.

 

The parking lot is adequate to meet the needs of both students and staff during the school day as well as the general public when events are held. There is adequate lighting for night time affairs. A generous number of handicapped parking spaces are located next to the building entrance with ramps to access the sidewalk and the building itself.

 

Central air conditioning serves all of the main building, except the science room, with heat and cooling. The science room has only “swamp coolers” (it was the kitchen of the restaurant which formerly occupied the building). Each of the portables has its own heating and cooling unit.

 

The food vending machines, microwave ovens and bottled drinking water are located in the hall near the assembly room and restrooms. The area becomes very crowded during the morning break and at lunch time.

 

The two student restrooms are conveniently located, in good repair and are adequate in size for the population. It was noted during the Fall of 2005 that there were times when the water pressure would drop sufficiently to cause the urinals to run continuously and for the toilets not to flush properly. This was related to a faulty pressure regulator and the impact of the outdoor irrigation system turning on.

 

The main building and all of the portables are connected to a fire alarm system which is directly connected to the local fire department. The security system which is monitored by PSI Security serves the main building. A “panic button” connected to the alarm system is in the administrative office permitting office personnel to activate an alarm in case of emergency. The portables have bars on the windows and dead bolts on the doors. The entrance to the building is secured by a double set of doors and access through the second set of doors is controlled by administrative personnel in the school office. Visitors must sign in and identify themselves before being permitted to go beyond the foyer. Six security cameras are located throughout the building and on the outside areas and are monitored in the administrative office.

 

Repairs Needed


Following a review of the facility’s status in the Fall of 2005, it was determined that the following modifications and repairs were needed:

  1. The assembly hall needed to be made more useful for theater productions (stage, curtains, lighting, dressing rooms, etc.)
  2. The science room needed to be serviced by the central air conditioning system.
  3. The crowding in the vending machine area needed to be relieved.
  4. The two classrooms which share the same large space (divided only by an eight foot high partition) needed a floor to ceiling wall and door to control sound.
  5. The water pressure needed to be more uniform and high enough to operate the toilets and urinals properly.
  6. The inconvenience of replacing water bottles in the drinking fountain and the litter and waste of using paper cups needed to be ended by installing a drinking fountain connected to the building water supply.

 

 

Corrective Actions Taken or Planned


The following actions have been taken or planned with regard to the items listed above:

  1. A group of parents and other volunteers from the community joined with school staff in making the assembly room able to serve as a theater for school drama productions and for use by community organizations. The stage was expanded; side entrances were made; a costume room and dressing room were created at the rear of the stage; stage and side curtains were hung; and a stage lighting system was installed; and a sound system with a control booth at the rear of the hall was added. Most of the work was completed early in the fall semester, but the sound system and booth, which was an Eagle Scout project, was not completed until the summer of 2006.
  2. Additional ducts are installed to connect the science room to the central air conditioning and heating system during the summer of 2006.
  3. The food vending machines and microwave ovens were moved to the west end of the main hall near the double doors which open out to the outdoor lunch area. The west end of the hall is more than twice the width of the area where the machines were formerly located. Student traffic in and out of the restrooms no longer conflicts with the traffic around the vending machines.
  4. The half wall between rooms two and three was extended to the ceiling and a closing door was installed between the two rooms during the summer of 2006.
  5. A new pressure regulator was installed and the landscape company was asked to retime the sprinkler system to operate only at times when school was not in session.
  6. A stainless steel drinking fountain has been donated to the school, but has not yet been installed. Locations for indoor and outdoor drinking fountains have not yet been identified. The structure of the building and the location of existing water lines makes the determination difficult. This problem still needs to be solved. In the meantime, the staff will continue to make bottled water and sanitary paper cups available at all times.



Curriculum and Instructional Materials
 

 
 
 
 Core Curriculum Areas


 Pupils Who Lack
Textbooks and
Instructional
Materials


 Reading/Language Arts

N/A  

 Mathematics

 N/A  

 Science

  N/A  

 History-Social Science

  N/A  

 Foreign Language

  N/A  

 Health

  N/A  

 Science Laboratory Equipment   
   (grades 9-12)

  N/A  

School Finances
 

 
 
 
 Level


 Expenditures
Per Pupil
(Unrestricted
Sources Only)


 School Site         

$6,246   

 District

 

 State 

 $4,743

 

Student Performance
 

 
 
 
 Subject


 Students Proficient
and Above on
California
Standards Tests


 English-Language Arts   

53 

 Mathematics   

20 

 Science   

17 

 History-Social Science   

36 

Academic Progress
 

 
 
 
 Indicator


 
 
 
    Result    


 2006 API Growth Score   
   (from 2006 API Growth Report)

 756

 Statewide Rank   
   (from 2005 API Base Report)   

 9

 2006-07 Program Improvement Status   

 

 

School Completion
 

 
 Indicator 


 
 Result 


 Graduation Rate   

96%

Postsecondary Preparation
 

 
 Measures


 Percent of 
 Graduates 


 Completed a Career Technical 
   Education Program

0%

 Completed All Courses Required 
   for
University of California/
   
California State University Admission   

 

 

13%

 



    School Accountability Report Card    
  Reported for School Year 2005-06  

Published During 2006-07

 

The School Accountability Report Card (SARC), which is required by law to be published annually, contains information about the condition and performance of each California public school. More information about SARC requirements is available at the California Department of Education (CDE) Web site at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/ac/sa/. For additional information about the school, parents and community members should contact the school principal or the district office. DataQuest, an online data tool at http://data1.cde.ca.gov/dataquest/, contains additional information about this school and comparisons of the school to the district, the county, and the state.


I. About This School

Contact Information
This section provides the school's contact information.

School

District

 School Name

 Sun Valley Charter High School

 District Name

 Ramona City Unified

 Street

 2102 Main St.

 Phone Number

  760-787-2007

 City, State, Zip

 Ramona, CA    92065-

 Web Site

  www.ramona.k12.ca.us

 Phone Number

  760-788-8008

 Superintendent

  Peter Schiff

 Principal

  David A. Tarr

 E-mail Address

  [email protected]

 E-mail Address

  [email protected]

 ---

 ---


School Description and Mission Statement
This section provides information about the school's goals and programs.

 

Educational Program

 

Mission Statement

 

The mission of Sun Valley Charter School is to inform, inspire, and empower students living in the rural community of Ramona utilizing creative instructors, a comprehensive curriculum, an integrated educational philosophy, and an innovative learning environment. Through Sun Valley Charter School, students will cultivate academic excellence, achieve technological proficiency, and develop practical skills; they will understand our diverse society from a perspective that comprises world and national history; they will become self-motivated, competent, lifelong learners, and they will kindle a lifelong desire for personal enrichment, strong family relationships, and community involvement.

 

Educational Philosophy

 

The Charter School will educate all students who enroll in the Charter School regardless of race, ethnicity, gender, or disability in grades 9-12. It is assumed that the School will draw students from Ramona and the surrounding communities.

 

The Stakeholders of Sun Valley Charter School believe learning best occurs when education is:

 

Integrated: Life is an integrated experience, not a series of compartmentalized activities. Education should mirror life, not just connecting the various realms of knowledge, but also intertwining them.

 

Sequential: We understand our personal life as a series of integrated sequential events. Education should help us to understand our world in a like manner.

 

Demanding: Life gives us increasingly demanding challenges. As we master those challenges, we are strengthened. Education should accord us similar challenges and provide the means by which we can master them.

 

Diverse and Individual: The world is comprised of people with diverse interests, talents, and abilities. Education should recognize this diversity and provide opportunities for individual development.

 

Mental and Physical: In life, we must exercise both the mind and the body to become a well-balanced individual. Education should serve and enhance both the mental and physical sides of our nature.

 

Theoretical and Practical: Success in life is dependent not only on the knowledge we have acquired, but also on the skills we have mastered. Education should encompass both the theoretical and the practical.

 

 

Intellectual and Emotional: We experience life with the head and heart, intellect and emotion. Education should help us to develop both.

 

Empowering: In life, knowledge is power. Education should empower us to lead free and independent lives, acting responsibly on behalf of our families, our community, and our nation.

 

Stakeholders believe that an educated person in the 21st Century is empowered by creating strong ties with community and family, having an understanding of world and national history, and developing the academic, technical, and practical skill proficiencies necessary to achieve his or her own interpretation of success.

 

Educational Strategy

 

The Charter School employs an integrated approach to the curriculum. Whenever possible, courses are designed to make connections between history, geography, English, science, math, art, music, and philosophy. All subjects are addressed in a setting that allows the free flow of ideas across artificial academic boundaries. Faculty and students are encouraged to explore the connections between the subject matter in one area with that of another. Ideas discussed in one class are elaborated upon in others, but from a different perspective.

 

The curriculum opens doors. It does not close minds. Within each field of study, students are given choices for independent exploration. Individual research, in areas of interest to the student, will stimulate a greater enthusiasm for the topic and give the student a sense of ownership in the work. Students are encouraged to challenge old notions and seek out new explanations.

 

As appropriate, the Charter School employs technology in the classroom. Technology plays a major role in our school, as it does in the 21st century world. From the first day, students are expected to work on the computer, learning the basic skills they need to compete in the modern work force. Students go beyond merely learning how to use computer programs - they learn how to use those programs to develop finished products. Students are given access to an electronic library and other electronic resources that enable them to research projects from home as well as at school. The use of electronic resources allows the Charter School to adapt and update its curriculum on a regular basis.

 

Classroom activities are designed to accommodate variations in the ways students learn. Howard Gardner’s theory on multiple intelligences helps to guide teaching strategies. Classroom activities may include, but are not limited to, lectures, graphic presentations, multi-media presentations, discussions, group activities, independent research, hands-on activities, and student presentations.

 

Academic Standards

 

The courses of the Charter School meet California State Standards.

 

Curriculum

 

The standard curriculum is based on a four-year course of study, with the first two years providing a unified core of knowledge and the last two years providing diversification into areas of student interest. The Charter School has developed courses that satisfy the a-g entrance requirements of the University of California. The Charter School is fully accredited by the Schools Division of the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC). All courses currently offered by the Charter School are fully transferable to any high school in the United States.

 
 


Opportunities for Parental Involvement
This section provides
information about opportunities for parents to become involved with school activities.

 

Parents are invited to participate as much as they would like in their student's education at school. Most are not able to come to school during they day, but they do help in after school programs and at home.

 

Each year, we have a Back to School Night within the first few weeks of the first semester. We begin with some introductory remarks, then send the parents to the classrooms to meet with the teachers and find out their expectations for the year. Our open houses are generally well attended for a high school.

 

Many parents have assisted in the remodeling and maintenance of the school's facilities. Those efforts have been mentioned previously in the application.

 

Parents are also involved as chaperones and drivers. They have helped us on field trips and at dances. We do not have a transportation budget, so we rely on parents to transport students on field trips.

 

Parents also serve on committees at SVCHS. Currently, parents are serving on the personnel committee, the finance committee, and the curriculum committee.

 

Parents track their student's physical education activity. SVCHS students obtain their P.E. credits through an independent study contract. It is the parents' job to track the hours they spend doing physical activity and write it down in a P.E. Log. The logs are then turned in and incorporated in the gradebook.

 

Parents also give assistance with big projects. For the plow day and trebuchet hurl, parents help transport students and supervise the activities. They also help with after school clubs and sports and often attend drama rehearsals

 
 
 


Student Enrollment by Grade Level
This table displays the number of students enrolled in each grade level at the school.

 Grade Level

 Number of Students

 Grade Level

 Number of Students

 Kindergarten

 Grade 8

 Grade 1

 Ungraded Elementary

 Grade 2

 Grade 9

47 

 Grade 3

 Grade 10

31 

 Grade 4

 Grade 11

27 

 Grade 5

 Grade 12

23 

 Grade 6

 Ungraded Secondary

 Grade 7

 Total Enrollment

128 


Student Enrollment by Group
This table displays the percent of students enrolled at the school who are identified as being in a particular group.

 Group

 Percent of
Total Enrollment

 Group

 Percent of
Total Enrollment

 African American

0.0 

 White (not Hispanic)

82.8 

 American Indian or Alaska Native

2.3 

 Multiple or No Response

0.8 

 Asian

0.0 

 Socioeconomically Disadvantaged

1.1 

 Filipino

0.8 

 English Learners

4.6 

 Hispanic or Latino

13.3 

 Students with Disabilities

6.0 

 Pacific Islander

0.0 

 ---

 ---


Average Class Size and Class Size Distribution (Elementary)
This table displays by grade level the average class size and the number of classrooms that fall into each size category (a range of total students per classroom).
 
  N/A
Average Class Size and Class Size Distribution (Secondary)
This table displays by subject area the average class size and the number of classrooms that fall into each size category (a range of total students per classroom).

 Subject

 2003-04

 2004-05

 2005-06

 Avg.
Class
Size

Number of
Classrooms

 Avg.
Class
Size

Number of
Classrooms

 Avg.
Class
Size

Number of
Classrooms

 1-20

 21-32

 33+

 1-20

 21-32

 33+

 1-20

 21-32

 33+

 English

 

 

 

 

 23.3

 2

 1

 

 17.9

 4

 3

 

 Mathematics

 17.7

 2

 1

 

 13.2

 5

 

 

 15.3

 6

 1

 

 Science

 26.5

 

 2

 

 21.7

 2

 1

 

 17.3

 4

 2

 

 Social Science

 

 

 

 

 21.5

 2

 2

 

 17.3

 5

 4

 


Participation in the Class Size Reduction Program
This table displays the percent of students in kindergarten trough grade 3 who were assigned to a classroom that participated in the Class Size Reduction Program.
 
  N/A
II. School Climate

School Safety Plan
This section provides information about the school's comprehensive safety plan.

The Charter School has adopted and implemented a comprehensive set of health, safety, and risk management policies. These policies address the following topics:

 

        A requirement that all enrolling students and staff provide records documenting immunizations to the extent required for enrollment in non‑charter public schools

        Policies and procedures for response to natural disasters and emergencies, including fires and earthquakes

        Policies relating to preventing contact with blood‑borne pathogens

        A policy requiring that instructional and administrative staff receive training in emergency response, including appropriate "first responder" training or its equivalent

        Policies relating to the administration of prescription drugs and other medicines

        A policy that the Charter School will be housed in facilities that have received state Fire Marshal approval and meet State Building Code requirements.

        A policy establishing that the Charter School functions as a drug, alcohol, and tobacco free workplace

        A requirement that each employee of the Charter School submit to a criminal background check and furnish a criminal record summary as required by Education Code Section 44237 and full compliance by the Charter School with Education Code Section 45125.1.

 

These policies have been incorporated as appropriate into the School's student and staff handbooks and are reviewed on an ongoing basis in the Charter School's staff development efforts and Board policies 
 
 


School Discipline Practices
This section provides information about the school's efforts to create and maintain a positive learning environment, including the school's use of disciplinary strategies.

The learning environment at Sun Valley Charter High School provides many and varied opportunities for students to interact with staff and each other. Classes are small and students receive individual attention from teachers. Varied instructional techniques include hands-on projects, access to technology, and a positive discipline plan which is clearly stated to all students and parents. Close contact is maintained between school staff and parents through detailed progress reports every six weeks, scheduled conferences, phone calls and Emails.

 

Classroom and campus rules are consistently and fairly enforced with the primary responsibility resting on the classroom teacher. The administration is readily available to provide intervention when classroom teacher efforts fail. A positive detention system is employed in which teachers assign after school time for minor rule infractions. Those who fail to attend detention are assigned Saturday school. Failure to attend Saturday school is considered defiance and is subject to suspension. After school detention is held two afternoons a week at which time students are assigned tasks related to campus clean-up and beautification. Saturday schools are conducted in much the same manner as afternoon detentions. Major violations of school rules are dealt with by suspensions and serious violations may lead to expulsion. 

 

 


Suspensions and Expulsions
This table displays the rate of suspensions and expulsions (the total number of incidents divided by the total enrollment) at the school and district levels for the most recent three-year period.

 Rate

 School

 District

 2003-04

 2004-05

 2005-06

 2003-04

 2004-05

 2005-06

 Suspensions

.52 

.07 

.16 

 

 

 

 Expulsions

.02 

 

 

 


III. School Facilities

School Facility Conditions and Improvements
This section provides information about the condition of the school’s grounds, buildings, and restrooms, and a description of any planned or recently completed facility improvements.

 
See School Facilities page 6 of executive summary 
 


School Facility Conditions Good Repair Status
This table displays the results of the most recently completed school site inspection to determine the school facility's good repair status.

 Item Inspected

 Facility in
Good Repair

 Repair Needed and
Action Taken or Planned

 Yes

 No

 Gas Leaks

 

 

 Mechanical Systems

 

X

See School Facilities page 6

 Windows/Doors/Gates (interior and exterior)

 

 

 Interior Surfaces (walls, floors, and ceilings)

 

 

 Hazardous Materials (interior and exterior)

 

 

 Structural Damage

 

 

 Fire Safety

 

 

 Electrical (interior and exterior)

 

 

 Pest/Vermin Infestation

 

 

 Drinking Fountains (inside and outside)

 

X

See School Facilities page 6

 Restrooms

 

 

 Sewer

 

 

 Playground/School Grounds

 

 

 Other

 

 

 


IV. Teachers

Teacher Credentials
This table displays the number of teachers assigned to the school with a full credential, without a full credential, and those teaching outside of their subject area of competence. Detailed information about teacher qualifications can be found at the CDE Web site at http://dq.cde.ca.gov/dataquest/.

 Teachers

 School

 District

   2003-04  

   2004-05  

   2005-06  

   2005-06  

 With Full Credential

 3

 7

 8

 308

 Without Full Credential

 2

 0

 2

 4

 Teaching Outside Subject Area of Competence

 

 

 

 ---


Teacher Misassignments and Vacant Teacher Positions
This table displays the number of teacher misassignments (teachers assigned without proper legal authorization) and the number of vacant teacher positions (not filled by a single designated teacher assigned to teach the entire course at the beginning of the school year or semester). Note: Total Teacher Misassignments includes the number of Misassignments of Teachers of English Learners.

 Indicator

   2004-05  

   2005-06  

   2006-07  

 Misassignments of Teachers of English Learners

 

 

 

 Total Teacher Misassignments

 

 

 

 Vacant Teacher Positions

 

 

 


Core Academic Classes Taught by NCLB Compliant Teachers
This table displays the percent of classes in core academic subjects taught by No Child Left Behind (NCLB) compliant and non-NCLB compliant teachers at the school, at all schools in the district, at high-poverty schools in the district, and at low-poverty schools in the district. More information on teacher qualifications required under NCLB can be found at http://www.cde.ca.gov/nclb/sr/tq/.

 Location of Classes

 Percent of Classes In Core Academic Subjects

 Taught by
 NCLB Compliant Teachers

 Taught by
 Non-NCLB Compliant Teachers

 This School 

 100.0

 0.0

 All Schools in District 

 -

-

 High-Poverty Schools in District 

 -

-

 Low-Poverty Schools in District 

 -

-


Substitute Teacher Availability
This section provides information about the availability of qualified substitute teachers and the impact of any difficulties in this area on the school's instructional program.

 
A pool of certificated teachers is used as daily substitutes for regular teachers as needed. 
 


Teacher Evaluation Process
This section provides information about the procedures and the criteria for teacher evaluations.

The teacher evaluation process includes goal setting, formal classroom observations, and post observation conferences. New teachers are evaluated twice a year; returning teachers once a year. The California Standards for the Teaching Profession are used as criteria for the written evaluation.


V. Support Staff

Academic Counselors and Other Support Staff
This table displays, in units of full-time equivalents (FTE), the number of academic counselors and other support staff who are assigned to the school and the average number of students per academic counselor. One FTE equals one staff member working full time; one FTE could also represent two staff members who each work 50 percent of full time.

 Title

 Number of FTE
 Assigned to School

 Average Number of
 Students per
 Academic Counselor

 Academic Counselor

.20 

128 

 Library Media Teacher (Librarian)

 

 ---

 Library Media Services Staff (paraprofessional)

 

 ---

 Psychologist

 

 ---

 Social Worker

 

 ---

 Nurse

 

 ---

 Speech/Language/Hearing Specialist

 

 ---

 Resource Specialist (non-teaching)

 

 ---

 Other

 

 ---


VI. Curriculum and Instructional Materials

Quality, Currency, and Availability of Textbooks and Instructional Materials
This table displays information about the quality, currency, and availability of the standards-aligned textbooks and other instructional materials used at the school, and information about the school's use of any supplemental curriculum or non-adopted textbooks or instructional materials.

 Core Curriculum Area

 Quality, Currency, and
 Availability of Textbooks and
 Instructional Materials

 Percent of Pupils
 Who Lack Their Own
 Assigned Textbooks and
 Instructional Materials

 Reading/Language Arts

State standards aligned textbooks and online materials.

  0%

 Mathematics

Geometry – state standards aligned textbooks. Pre-Algebra, Algebra I, Algebra II – state standards aligned interactive computer program. Pre-Calculus – state standards aligned textbooks (shared)

4.6%

 Science

Earth Science -   state standards aligned electronic resources.

Biology - state standards aligned textbooks (Individual issue).

Integrated Science - state standards aligned textbooks (Individual issue).

Physics - state standards aligned textbooks (Individual issue).

  0%

 History-Social Science

World Studies – no state standards for this course. Electronic materials.

World History - state standards aligned textbooks (Individual issue).

U.S. History - state standards aligned textbooks (Individual issue).

Civics – State standards aligned electronic resources.

Economics - State standards aligned textbooks and online materials (Individual issue).

18.7% 

 Foreign Language

Spanish I - state standards aligned textbooks (class set). Workbooks (individual issue).

Spanish II - state standards aligned textbooks (class set). Workbooks (individual issue).

Spanish III and Spanish IV – state standards aligned teacher selected materials.

100% 

 Health

State standards aligned textbooks and media materials (Individual issue). 

  0%

 Science Laboratory Equipment (grades 9-12)

Equipment sufficient for all students to participate at the same time.

 0%


VII. School Finances

Expenitures Per Pupil and School Site Teacher Salaries (Fiscal Year 2004-05)
This table displays a comparison of the school's per pupil expenditures from unrestricted (basic) sources with other schools in the district and throughout the state, and a comparison of the average teacher salary at the school site with average teacher salaries at the district and state levels. Detailed information regarding salaries can be found at the CDE Web site at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ds/fd/ec/ and http://www.cde.ca.gov/ds/fd/cs/.

 Level

 Total
 Expenditures
 Per Pupil

 Expenditures
 Per Pupil
 (Supplemental)

 Expenditures
 Per Pupil
 (Basic)

 Average
 Teacher
 Salary

 School Site

$6,246 

$290

$5,956

$39,110

 District

 ---

 ---

 

 $60,633

 Percent Difference - School Site and District

 ---

 ---

 

 

 State

 ---

 ---

 $4,743

 $57,067

 Percent Difference - School Site and State

 ---

 ---

+20% 

-31%


Types of Services Funded
This section provides information about the programs and supplemental services that are available at the school and funded through either categorical or other sources.

Basic core academic program

ASB

Robotics 

Before and after school tutoring

Moodle on-line assignments and resources

Special Education services contract with the Ramona Unified School District 


Teacher and Administrative Salaries (Fiscal Year 2004-05)
This table displays district-level salary information for teachers, principals, and superintendents, and compares these figures to the state averages for districts of the same type and size. The table also displays teacher and administrative salaries as a percent of a district's budget, and compares these figures to the state averages for districts of the same type and size. Detailed information regarding salaries can be found at the CDE Web site at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ds/fd/cs/ and http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/ac/sa/salaries0405.asp.

 Category

 District
 Amount

 State Average
 For Districts
 In Same Category

 Beginning Teacher Salary

 $36,659

 $37,730

 Mid-Range Teacher Salary

 $62,847

 $59,397

 Highest Teacher Salary

 $79,565

 $72,979

 Average Principal Salary (Elementary)

 $95,419

 $90,266

 Average Principal Salary (Middle)

 $108,975

 $95,759

 Average Principal Salary (High)

 $115,562

 $103,395

 Superintendent Salary

 $152,602

 $143,489

 Percent of Budget for Teacher Salaries

 42.4

 41.5

 Percent of Budget for Administrative Salaries

 5.4

 5.6


VIII. Student Performance

California Standards Tests
The California Standards Tests (CST) show how well students are doing in relation to the state content standards. The CSTs include English-language arts and mathematics in grades 2 through 11; science in grades 5, 8, 9, 10, and 11; and history-social science in grades 8, 10, and 11. Student scores are reported as performance levels. Detailed information regarding CST results for each grade and proficiency level, including the percent of students not tested, can be found at the CDE Web site at http://star.cde.ca.gov/. Note: To protect student privacy, scores are not shown when the number of students tested is 10 or less.

CST Results for All Students -- Three-Year Comparison
This table displays the percent of students achieving at the Proficient or Advanced level (meeting or exceeding the state standards).

 Subject

 School

 District

 State

 2004

 2005

 2006

 2004

 2005

 2006

 2004

 2005

 2006

 English-Language Arts

 52

 60

 53

 46

 51

 53

 36

 40

 42

 Mathematics

 36

 24

 20

 45

 46

 49

 34

 38

 40

 Science

 29

 36

 17

 34

 42

 42

 25

 27

 35

 History-Social Science

 19

 61

 36

 41

 42

 41

 29

 32

 33


CST Results by Student Group - Most Recent Year
This table displays the percent of students, by group, achieving at the Proficient or Advanced level (meeting or exceeding the state standards) for the most recent testing period.

 Group

 Percent of Students Scoring at Proficient or Advanced

 English-
Language Arts

 Mathematics

 Science

 History-
Social Science

 African American

 

 

 

 

 American Indian or Alaska Native

 *

 *

 *

 *

 Asian

 

 

 

 

 Filipino

 

 

 

 

 Hispanic or Latino

 36

 14

 *

 *

 Pacific Islander

 

 

 

 

 White (Not Hispanic)

 56

 22

 15

 38

 Male

 43

 22

 17

 46

 Female

 64

 19

 17

 27

 Economically Disadvantaged

 *

 *

 

 

 English Learners

 *

 *

 

 

 Students with Disabilities

 *

 *

 *

 *

 Students Receiving Migrant Education Services

 

 

 

 


Norm-Referenced Test (NRT)
The norm-referenced test (NRT), currently the California Achievement Test, Sixth Edition (CAT/6), shows how well students are doing compared to students nationally in reading, language, spelling, and mathematics in grades 3 and 7 only. The results are reported as the percent of tested students scoring at or above the national average (the 50th percentile). Detailed information regarding NRT results for each grade level can be found at the CDE Web site at http://star.cde.ca.gov/. Note: To protect student privacy, scores are not shown when the number of students tested is 10 or less.

NRT Results for All Students -- Three Year Comparison
This table displays the percent of students scoring at or above the national average (the 50th percentile) in reading and mathematics.

Subject

 School

 District

 State

 2004

 2005

 2006

 2004

 2005

 2006

 2004

 2005

 2006

 Reading

 68

 

 

 53

 51

 53

 43

 41

 42

 Mathematics

 62

 

 

 61

 64

 63

 51

 52

 53


NRT Results by Student Group -- Most Recent Year
This table displays the percent of students, by group, scoring at or above the national average (the 50th percentile) in reading and mathematics for the most recent testing period.

Group

 Percent of Students Scoring at or
Above the National Average

 Reading

 Mathematics

 African American

 

 

 American Indian or Alaska Native

 

 

 Asian

 

 

 Filipino

 

 

 Hispanic or Latino

 

 

 Pacific Islander

 

 

 White (not Hispanic)

 

 

 Male

 

 

 Female

 

 

 Economically Disadvantaged

 

 

 English Learners

 

 

 Students with Disabilities

 

 

 Students Receiving Migrant Education Services

 

 


Local Assessment Results
Districts may choose to administer their own academic assessments in reading, writing, and mathematics. In such cases, this table displays the percent of students, by grade level and subject area, meeting or exceeding the district standard.

 Grade
Level

 Reading

 Writing

 Mathematics

 2004

 2005

 2006

 2004

 2005

 2006

 2004

 2005

 2006

 K

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 9

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 10

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 11

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 12

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


California Physical Fitness Test Results
The California Physical Fitness Test is administered to students in grades 5, 7, and 9 only. This table displays by grade level the percent of students meeting fitness standards (scoring in the healthy fitness zone on all six fitness standards) for the most recent testing period. Detailed information regarding the California Physical Fitness Test, and comparisons of a school's test results to the district and state levels, can be found at the CDE Web site at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/tg/pf/. Note: To protect student privacy, scores are not shown when the number of students tested is 10 or less.
 
Individual results of the California Fitness Test have been received from the state and placed in student cumulative files. A copy was mailed home to parents. The school results have not yet been made available on-line.


IX. Accountability

Academic Performance Index

The Academic Performance Index (API) is an annual measure of the academic performance and progress of schools in California. API scores range from 200 to 1,000, with a statewide target of 800. Detailed information about the API can be found at the CDE Web site at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/ac/ap/.

API Ranks -- Three-Year Comparison
This table displays the school's statewide and similar schools API ranks. The statewide API rank ranges from 1 to 10. A statewide rank of 1 means that the school has an API score in the lowest 10 percent of all schools in the state, while a statewide rank of 10 means that the school has an API score in the highest 10 percent of all schools in the state. The similar schools API rank reflects how a school compares to 100 statistically matched "similar schools." A similar schools rank of 1 means that the school's academic performance is comparable to the lowest performing 10 schools of the 100 similar schools, while a similar schools rank of 10 means that the school's academic performance is better than at least 90 of the 100 similar schools.

 API Rank

 2003-04

 2004-05

 2005-06

 Statewide

 6

 8

 9

 Similar Schools

 N/A

 N/A

 N/A


API Changes by Student Group -- Three Year Comparison
This table displays, by student group, the actual API changes in points added or lost for the past three years, and the most recent API score. Note: "N/A" means that the student group is not numerically significant.

 Group

 Actual API Change

 API Score

 2003-04

 2004-05

 2005-06

 2006

 All Students at the School

 39

 63

 -49

 756

 African American

 

 

 

 

 American Indian or Alaska Native

 

 

 

 

 Asian

 

 

 

 

 Filipino

 

 

 

 

 Hispanic or Latino

 

 

 

 

 Pacific Islander

 

 

 

 

 White (not Hispanic)

 

 

 

 

 Socioeconomically Disadvantaged

 

 

 

 

 English Learners

 --

 --

 

 

 Students with Disabilities

 --

 --

 

 


State Award and Intervention Programs
This section will contain information about the school's participation in various state intervention and award programs only to the extent these programs were funded for the period addressed by this report.

 
N/A 
 


Adequate Yearly Progress
The federal NCLB act requires that all schools and districts meet the following Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) criteria:

Detailed information about AYP, including participation rates and percent proficient results by student group, can be found at the CDE Web site at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/ac/ay/.

AYP Overall and by Criteria
This table displays an indication of whether the school and the district made AYP overall and whether the school and the district met each of the AYP criteria.

 AYP Criteria

 School

 District

 Overall

 Yes

 Yes

 Participation Rate - English-Language Arts

 Yes

 Yes

 Participation Rate – Mathematics

 Yes

 Yes

 Percent Proficient - English-Language Arts

 Yes

 Yes

 Percent Proficient – Mathematics

 Yes

 Yes

 API

 Yes

 Yes

 Graduation Rate

 Yes

 Yes


Federal Intervention Program
Schools and districts receiving federal Title I funding enter Program Improvement (PI) if they do not make AYP for two consecutive years in the same content area (English-language arts or mathematics) or on the same indicator (API or graduation rate). After entering PI, schools and districts advance to the next level of intervention with each additional year that they do not make AYP. Detailed information about PI identification can be found at the CDE Web site at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/ac/ay/.

 Indicator

    School   

    District   

 Program Improvement Status 

 

 

 First Year of Program Improvement Implementation 

 

 

 Year in Program Improvement 

 

 

 Number of Schools Currently in Program Improvement 

 ---

 2

 Percent of Schools Currently in Program Improvement 

 ---

 20.0


X. School Completion and Postsecondary Preparation

Dropout Rate and Graduation Rate
This table displays the school's one-year dropout rates and graduation rates for the most recent three-year period. For comparison purposes, data are also provided at the district and state levels. Detailed information about dropout rates and graduation rates can be found at the CDE Web site at http://dq.cde.ca.gov/dataquest/.

 Indicator

 School

 District

 State

 2002-03

 2003-04

 2004-05

 2002-03

 2003-04

 2004-05

 2002-03

 2003-04

 2004-05

 Dropout Rate (1-year)

 N/A

N/A

N/A

 1.5

 0.7

 0.8

 3.2

 3.3

 3.1

 Graduation Rate

N/A

N/A

N/A

 94.4

 96.6

 94.5

 86.7

 85.3

 84.9


Completion of High School Graduation Requirements
Beginning with the graduating class of 2006, students in California public schools must pass both the English-language arts and mathematics portions of the California High School Exit Examination (CAHSEE) to receive a high school diploma. For students who began the 2005-06 school year in the 12th grade, this table displays by student group the percent of students who met all state and local graduation requirements for grade 12 completion, including having passed both portions of the CAHSEE or received a local waiver or state exemption. Due to the state's collection schedule for high school completion data, state level data for this reporting element will not be available for report cards published in the 2006-07 school year. Detailed information about the CAHSEE can be found at the CDE Web site at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/tg/hs/. Note: "N/A" means that the student group is not numerically significant.

Group

 Graduating Class of 2006

 School

 District

 State

 All Students

 96%

 

  ---

 African American

 -

 

  ---

 American Indian or Alaska Native

 -

 

  ---

 Asian

 N/A

 

  ---

 Filipino

 N/A

 

  ---

 Hispanic or Latino

 100%

 

  ---

 Pacific Islander

 -

 

  ---

 White (not Hispanic)

 94%

 

  ---

 Socioeconomically Disadvantaged

N/A 

 

  ---

 English Learners

 -

 

  ---

 Students with Disabilities

 N/A

 

  ---


Career Technical Education Programs
This section provides information about the degree to which pupils are prepared to enter the workforce, including a list of career technical education (CTE) programs offered at the school.

 
Networking Technology course (not CTE) 
 


Career Technical Education Participation
This table displays information about participation in the school's CTE programs.

 Measure 

 CTE Program Participation

 Number of Pupils

  N/A

 Percent of pupils completing a CTE program
 and earning a high school diploma

  N/A

 Percent of CTE courses sequenced or
 articulated between the school and institutions
 of postsecondary education

  N/A


Courses for University of California and/or California State University Admission
This table displays for the most recent year two measures related to the school's courses that are required for University of California (UC) and/or California State University (CSU) admission. Detailed information about student enrollment and completion of courses required for UC/CSU admission can be found at the CDE Web site at http://dq.cde.ca.gov/dataquest/.

 Indicator

 Percent 

 Students Enrolled in Courses Required for UC/CSU Admission  

 100

 Graduates Who Completed All Courses Required for UC/CSU Admission  

 13


Advanced Placement Courses
This table displays for the most recent year the number of Advanced Placement (AP) courses that the school offered by subject and the percent of the school's students enrolled in all AP courses. Detailed information about student enrollment in AP courses can be found at the CDE Web site at http://dq.cde.ca.gov/dataquest/.

 Subject

 Number of
AP Courses Offered

 Percent of Students
In AP Courses

 Computer Science

 

  ---

 English

 1

  2.3

 Fine and Performing Arts

 

  ---

 Foreign Language

 

  ---

 Mathematics

 

  ---

 Science

 1

  6.3

 Social Science

 1

2.3

 All courses

 3

 10.9


College Admission Test Preparation Course Program
This section provides information about the school's college admission test preparation course program.

 
N/A 
 


SAT Reasoning Test
This table displays the percent of the school's 12th grade students who voluntarily take the SAT Reasoning Test for college entrance, and the average verbal, math, and writing scores of those students. Detailed information regarding SAT results, and comparisons of these average scores to the district and state levels, can be found at the CDE Web site at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ds/sp/ai/. Note: To protect student privacy, scores are not shown when the number of students tested is 10 or less.
 
Five students in the 2006 graduating class took the test. Scores are not shown, because fewer than 10 students took the test.


X. Instructional Planning and Scheduling

School Instruction and Leadership
This section provides information about the structure of the school's instructional program and the experience of the school's leadership team.

Sun Valley Charter High School

Graduation Requirements – Regular Track

 

 

Graduation from Sun Valley Charter High School implies that students have satisfactorily completed the prescribed courses of study, satisfactorily passed examinations and other requirements set by the faculty, and passed the proficiency standards as required by law.

 

At the secondary level, grades 9 through 12, the following requirements must be met to graduate:

 

1. A total of 225 credits must be earned: 180 credits of required courses, 45 credits of electives. Each semester course is worth 5 credits if passed.

2. Each student must pass the following required courses:

 

• 4 years 40 credits English

• 4 years 45 credits Social Sciences, including:

World Studies (10) - 9th grade

World History I and II (10) - 10th grade

U.S. History (10) - 11th grade

Modern World History III (5) - 12th grade

Economics (5) - 12th grade

Civics (5) – 12th grade

• 3 years 30 credits Mathematics (including 1 year of Algebra I standards equivalent coursework)

 

• 3 years 30 credits Science including:

Earth Science (10) 9th grade

Integrated Science (includes physical science) (10)

10th grade

Biology w/lab (10) 11th grade

• 2 years 20 credits Physical Education (independent study contract: 12

hours = 1 credit)

• 1 year 10 credits Fine Arts or Foreign Language

• 1 semester 5 credits Health/Family Life (5)

 

3. Passing score on the state High School Exit Exam in order to receive a diploma.

 

Sun Valley Charter High School

Graduation Requirements – UNIVERSITY TRACK

 

Graduation from Sun Valley Charter High School implies that students have satisfactorily completed the prescribed courses of study, satisfactorily passed examinations and other requirements set by the faculty, and passed the proficiency standards as required by law. Additional coursework must be taken to meet the minimum requirements for university entrance. A student who passes the following courses will receive a diploma and satisfy the minimum entrance requirements for the University of California.

 

1. A total of 225 credits must be earned: Each semester course is worth 5 credits if passed.

2. Each student must pass the following required courses:

 

40 credits English I (10) 9th grade, English II (10) 10th grade,

English III (10) 11th grade, English IV (10) 12th grade

 

45 credits Social Sciences, including:

World Studies (10) - 9th grade

World History I and II (10) - 10th grade

U.S. History (10) - 11th grade

Modern World History III (5) - 12th grade

Economics (5) - 12th grade

Civics (5) – 12th grade

 

30 credits Mathematics, including:

Algebra I (10)

Geometry (10)

Algebra II (10)

(Trigonometry/Pre-Calculus Recommended)

 

40 credits Science, including:

Earth Science (10) 9th grade

Integrated Science (includes physical science) (10) 10th

grade

Biology w/lab (10) 11th grade

Chemistry w/lab (10) 12th grade

 

20 credits Physical Education (independent study contract: 12 hours = 1

credit)

 

10 credits Fine Arts (10) (Dance, drama/theater, music, and/or visual art)

 

20 credits Foreign Language I (10), Foreign Language II (10) (Must be same language for two years. Third and fourth year recommended.)

 

5 credits Health/Family Life (5)

 

10 credits Electives from UC A-F list (May include additional language,

math, or science courses.)

 

15 credits Other electives

 

3. Passing score on the state High School Exit Exam in order to receive a diploma.

 

 

HOW LEADERSHIP ENCOURAGES COMMITMENT

 

The first step in encouraging committment to the school’s educational program is finding teachers who are committed to the teaching profession already. They might be brand new or well-seasoned, but they share an enthusiasm for learning and a love of teaching. As the personnel committee searches for new teachers, they look for those who have a natural talent and desire to strive for excellence in their profession.

 

The executive director works with each teacher, through personal conversations and professional interaction, to instill in him or her the vision of the school. An understanding of the full vision of the school creates a desire within the teachers to help build that program. Seeing the big picture makes their piece of the puzzle make sense.

 

The school’s leadership works with the teachers in a cooperative manner to help develop the educational program from the ground up. Teachers are involved in every aspect of the school’s development from the curriculum to the scheduling to the facilities. That involvement gives the teachers a sense of ownership in the school and leads to greater personal commitment.

 

Finally, the very difficulty of the job itself helps develop a sense of committment to the program. Things that come easy are appreciated little. Those things at which people work the hardest tend to draw more out of thems and cause them to want to persevere. Because the work is so demanding, and because they are able to see the fruits of their labors, there is little desire on their part to give up and walk away from the program.

 

 

HOW LEADERSHIP ENCOURAGES PARTICIPATION

 

In a school the size of Sun Valley Charter High School, participation by all is a requirement. Without the full cooperation of all staff members, the school could not function. The key to maximum participation lies in hiring a professional staff, giving them direction, and letting them do what they are trained to do.

 

The greatest inducement to participation is the knowledge that your input will be appreciated and utilized. When teachers make suggestions, they know they will be given due consideration. If the suggestion is in alignment with the school’s vision, the idea will be fleshed out and presented to others for further refinement. If the suggestion falls outside the vision of the school, it is examined to see if some permutation of the idea can be useful. All suggestions are welcome and teachers are encouraged to look for ways to expand the scope of their instruction.

 

The area in which teachers are encouraged to participate the most is curriculum development. As soon as the original team of teachers was hired, they were set to the task of develping the ninth grade curriculum. They were asked to review the California State Standards, the UC course templates, and any national standards that might be available for their subject. They were then asked to work together to find areas in the curriculum where connections could be made from one subject to another. They worked as a team to develop a curriculum that was intertwined across academic fields. Throughout the summer of 2002, they met on a daily basis to work on the curriculum. Not only did they have a chance to create and refine the courses they themselves would teach, but they also had the chance to establish the method for developing the integrated curriculum that would be used by the school in the future. This was an opportunity to participate that is not offered to most classroom teachers. Over the next two summers, teachers would again participate in the curriculum development process, creating the courses for the tenth, eleventh, and twelfth grades.

 

In addition to developing course descriptions, teachers were encouraged to find electronic resources to use in their classes. The impetus for developing electronic resources was two-fold. First, very few resources exist that explore the cross-curricular connections our teachers had developed. There were no off-the-shelf textbooks that matched our integrated curriculum. Second, we wanted to find up to date resources in a format that would be more interesting to students who grew up with technology. The added bonus was that teachers were able to develop resources for their courses that they liked. Being able to customize the curriculum allowed them to personalize and internalize the process.

 

Outside of curriculum development, teachers have had many other avenues to participate. From the very beginning, the administration has held staff meetings on a regular basis to discuss all aspects of the school’s operation. Topics on the agenda at different times included: calendar, scheduling, discipline, technology, individual student needs, testing, grading, policies, safety, facilities, and others. At staff meetings, teachers are encouraged to participate fully, making comments and suggestions in all areas. The key to the success of the meetings is that all participate in the process.

 

One of the most important items of discussion at staff meetings is the curriculum calendar. The integrated approach to the curriculum demands that all teachers work as a team, and that all teachers stay on schedule. Each course is constructed to dovetail with the other courses, so there is a constant need to communicate what is happening in each class. To make sure they stay on schedule and integrated, the teachers have developed curriculum calendars for each grade level.

 

The original curriculum calendar was created as a matrix to show all of the areas to be taught and the connections to be made. Items were listed by topic, not by course. In the second year, the current format of the curriculum calendar was created, listing the weeks down the left side and showing the areas to be taught, by course, to the right. As the year proceeds, the teachers meet to discuss where they are on the calendar and if any adjustments need to be made.

 

 

HOW LEADERSHIP ENCOURAGES SHARED ACCOUNTABILITY

 

The leadership at Sun Valley Charter High School encourages shared accountability through open communication on all aspects of the school’s operation including discipline, student achievement, facilities maintenance, curriculum, and the budget.

 

Discipline guidelines are reviewed and discussed on a regular basis. At monthly staff meetings, teachers discuss areas of discipline where they are having some difficulties to see if there is a common problem that needs to be addressed by all staff members. Teachers are reminded that consistency is important and are given examples of what can happen when when teachers favor one student over another, or when one teacher is more lenient than another. Teachers discuss the issues among themselves and communicate with one another to ensure consistency.

 

On a regular basis, both during staff meetings and in conferences between the administrator and individual teachers, student achievement is discussed and analyzed. New assignments and projects are reviewed following their introduction, to determine whether or not there is sufficient value to the assignment to continue using them. Student grades and class curves are reviewed every grading period to determine if there is consistency in the grading from teacher to teacher. Standardized test scores are reviewed as a team so we can see our strengths and weaknesses together. Those results help us to determine on which areas we need to focus. Reviewing the results as a team allows the teachers to see how they can support each other. For instance, if a science score is low, because students are having difficulty reading the material, that would be an area where the English teacher could be of assistance.

 

In addition to their regular duties, our teachers shared responsibility for facility cleanliness and maintenance. Each teacher is assigned a room that is essentially theirs to care for. They are expected to keep the desks and floors clean from debris, and are provided the means for doing so. Students who have after-school detention empty trash cans on a regular basis. If teachers would like to have improvements to their room, they are encouraged to participate in the process to make the change.

 

Teachers work with the administration to make curriculum adjustments as the needs are identified. At regular meetings, staff members discuss the curriculum calendar as it relates to student performance and standardized testing. Teachers make suggestions on how the calendar might be modified to better arrange the course content to align with standards, or with other courses in the integrated sequence.

 

All teachers are made aware of budget limitations and are included in decisions regarding the purchase of books and other classroom supplies. They understand that funds are limited and are encouraged to find free sources for materials. The teachers at SVCHS have found many avenues for securing supplies that do not impact the budget.

 

 

STAFF EMPOWERMENT

 

Staff members feel a sense of empowerment through their participation in all aspects of the school’s operation. Curriculum development is the area in which they have the most impact, but their opinions and input have an effect on scheduling, technology, policies, facilities, and working conditions.

 

Each teacher has the opportunity to either create a course (within the state standards), or review and modify existing course outlines to keep them current. Teachers are encouraged to continually develop and update electronic resources and to create new assignments and projects. Projects that require large amounts of time or significant resources are reviewed by the administrator and discussed with the teacher. If changes are necessary, they work together to iron out the details.

 

Teachers share ideas on classroom instruction, but have autonomy to teach according to their own strengths in their own classrooms. They are encouraged to use classroom techniques that suit their unique talents and personalities. Originality is encouraged.

 

Teachers also have the opportunity to participate in discussion on the school schedule. While our calendar is set to match the Ramona Unified School District, our daily schedule is created by our staff. In our first year of operation, we started school at 7:15 a.m. and were finished by 1:45 p.m. Teachers and administration discussed the early morning start and decided that a later start would probably be better for the students. The starting time for school was changed to 8:00 a.m., and students appear to be more awake and better prepared for class.

 

The administration seeks input from teachers on the placement of students in classes. Teachers know the students best, and through their assessments, students can be placed into classes so that learning will be optimized. Conflicts between students are kept to a minimum and students who are helpful to one another are grouped together.

 

When selecting furniture or making modifications to classrooms, the teachers are consulted to make sure the change will work for them. Each teaching style requires a slightly different layout, so they are given furniture and equipment that suits them individually. Teachers are allowed to bring items into their rooms to personalize them, as long as they are in accordance with fire and saaaafety regulations. 
 
 


Professional Development
This section provides information about the program for training the school's teachers and other professional staff.

In many areas, there is a direct correlation between staff development and improved instruction. At Sun Valley Charter High School, we rely heavily on technology in the classroom. When teachers receive training in this area, it has a direct application. Teachers receive instruction and feedback on how to produce engaging PowerPoint presentations. When they lecture in the classroom, these electronic presentations take the place of notes on the whiteboard. Teachers are able to spend more time speaking directly to the students and less time writing out their notes on the board. PowerPoint presentations also allow teachers to include visual aids in their lectures, including animated demonstrations and short film clips. The school has two data projectors and one T.V. that have the capability of displaying PowerPoint presentations.

 

In addition to using technology directly in the classroom, our teachers have learned how to use the school’s website to increase student learning. The website not only allows students to see their assignments, but it allows them to download resources and worksheets that they can use for their classes. The teachers have learned how to create resources that can be accessed in the classroom or from home to give the students an extra boost.

 

The teachers at SVCHS have also received instruction on how to properly approach group projects. Group projects can be very instructive, but they can also lead to problems with students who tend to do little work depending on others to do the work for them. The teachers have been shown how to include individual components in the group project, as well as how to differentiate the grades, based on participation. They have also been shown how to avoid some of the common pitfalls of group work and how to motivate students who have a tendency to watch from the sidelines. The result has been more participation and better work products. By incorporating the ideas they have learned through our staff development time, we have seen greater participation and more interest on the part of the students.

 

On a regular basis, the newer teachers take advantage of a less formal system of staff development -- faculty mentors. Those teachers who have more experience in the classroom often work with the newer teachers to provide them with personal insights and encouragement. Newer teachers often encounter stiuations with which they are not familiar, and for which no textbook answer exists. The more seasoned teachers can give them advice on the spot that they can then take back into the classroom.

 

Another area where there has been great improvement is in long-term projects. There are some projects that should take students a little longer to complete, if they are done properly. Unfortunately, students tend to wait until the last minute, then rush through the project, often missing the point. This has been the topic of a few staff development meetings, and the teachers have now broken their projects down into smaller parts with deadlines along the way. The individual segments have points attached to them, so the students feel the need to get them done on time. By forcing the students to start earlier and produce interim results, the final products have been of higher quality. 
 
 


Instructional Minutes
This table displays a comparison of the number of instructional minutes offered at the school to the state requirement for each grade level.

 Grade
Level

 Instructional Minutes

 Offered

 State Requirement

 K

 

 36,000

 1

 

 50,400

 2

 

 50,400

 3

 

 50,400

 4

 

 54,000

 5

 

 54,000

 6

 

 54,000

 7

 

 54,000

 8

 

 54,000

 9

 64,800

 64,800

 10

 64,800

 64,800

 11

 64,800

 64,800

 12

 64,800

 64,800


Continuation School Instructional Days
This table displays a comparison of the number of instructional days offered at the continuation school to the state requirement for each grade level.

 Grade
Level

 Instructional Days With At Least 180 Instructional Minutes

 Offered

 State Requirement

 9

 

 180 days

 10

 

 180 days

 11

 

 180 days

 12

 

 180 days


Minimum Days in School Year
This section provides information about the total number of days in the most recent school year that students attended school on a shortened day schedule and the reasons for the shortened day schedule.

A total of 11 shortened days were held during the 2005-2006 school year:

6 days for final exams

5 days for parent conferences